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idob

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You & Your own Holy Grail
Dec 13, 09:42 PM 2015
I can freely say that many of your systems are almost holy grail. After reading and analyzing many of your systems here, I realize that you put many hours into the game of roulette. So many great bet selections & money management ideas.

What the most of you don't realize is that past spins will tell you nothing about what is going to happen in future spins. You're all doing great until run from hell comes and eat your bankroll. Please stop looking at past spins and rather focus on standard deviation (z-score). Crazy patterns will not happen when STD is crazy low / crazy high. Mild progressions will do a great job fighting win loss ratios when STD is already high / low.

Stop flat betting if you can't raise accuracy of predictions, as house edge is your primary enemy then - and you can't beat it. Use huge bankroll (with long progression) and wait mid-high STD or use semi-big bankroll (with mild progression) and high high STD to start betting.

I can't say exactly how to play and when to play as every system is unique and requires its own bankroll, progression and minimum STD to start betting. Test your bet selections in a software like "Roulette Xtreme" to see how STD behave with it, set your bankroll and see what is the minimum z-score value you need to wait in order to start betting and yes - you will beat roulette :)

Buffster

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Re: You & Your own Holy Grail
Dec 14, 12:26 AM 2015
It's funny when I hear people say that past spins don't affect future spins. Well this may be true if all you're doing is picking a number out of a hat and playing that number. But for all intents and purposes if you're going to build a chart to help you choose what number to play ( and that includes Z-SCORE ) then you need your PAST spin info to build that chart. So other than using the hat trick...Past spins will not predict future spins BUT the chart that you build using this information will help you see the information you hope to find using Standard Deviation.

So yes PAST spins don't have any bearing on future spins but they should be able to point you in the right direction.

So please Roulette Players....Don't discount the use of past spins.

Buffster

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Proofreaders2000

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Re: You & Your own Holy Grail
Dec 14, 12:29 AM 2015
Every system will lose from time to time.  Question is
does it lose infrequently enough to still remain in profit overall?

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Drazen

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Re: You & Your own Holy Grail
Dec 14, 05:06 AM 2015
It is true that using RTM we can predict with high accuracy if the next sample mean will larger or smaller than the previous one, but it isn't easy and simple to exploit this. In terms of betting on it :(

But If I may add that if someone wants to test using RTM as a betselction maybe better tool would be Bayses software "Sequence analyzer". With it one can create any wanted deviation on any part of the game, and resolve play spin by spin after it.

Cheers

Drazen

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Re: You & Your own Holy Grail
Dec 14, 07:15 AM 2015
Up until recently every system or method I ever used relied on past spins to give some guidance at least for what to bet on next.  I dont see how any mechanical method can't.  Most if not all rely on patterns.

It is true that using RTM we can predict with high accuracy if the next sample mean will larger or smaller than the previous one, but it isn't easy and simple to exploit this.

Not meaning to sound completely stupid here Drazen, but what does RTM mean?

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Drazen

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Re: You & Your own Holy Grail
Dec 14, 08:48 AM 2015
Oh button you are not sounding stupid it all. RTM is abbreviation for regression toward mean.

You can read about it here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean


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